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Mourning in Morning

A pallid sunrise created by the wildfire smoke that originated in the western United States and Canada (Larchmont, New York)—July 20, 2021

Climate scientists have long highlighted the overwhelming evidence that greenhouse gas pollution is driving a warming of the Earth’s climate. They have long warned that extreme weather and related events—heat waves, drought, floods, and wildfires—would result from ongoing climate change. Greenhouse gas polluters knowingly attacked the truth and deliberately pushed propaganda aimed at paralyzing policy. Policy makers remained oblivious

2021 has already seen an unprecedented heat wave crash upon North America’s Pacific Northwest; unsparing drought send reservoirs in California and Utah’s Great Salt Lake to record lows; exploding wildfires and fire tornadoes pillage parts of western North America and Siberia; terrible floods ravage parts of Europe, India, Nigeria, Russia, and China; and drought-driven famine stalk Madagascar’s helpless population like vultures awaiting death.

The suspects—those who bear primary responsibility for the climate catastrophes of this year and the even greater ones that lie ahead—are well-known. Yet, in many countries, policy makers remain enthralled by the siren song of those fossil fuel polluters. Many governments subsidize the expansion of these increasingly destructive enterprises and activities. People bear the enormous and growing burden of the costs and consequences of climate change.

The lifeless morning of July 20 is just the latest reminder that the world is now at, and perhaps beyond, a pivotal moment. That moment requires courageous, committed, and ethical leadership that, perhaps for the first time, puts the wellbeing of society ahead of the interests of the amoral architects of destructive climate change.

There is no refuge for the world’s peoples from climate change. There are no permanent resting places for the world’s peoples. The intervals between extreme events are temporary respites. Justice requires that there be no respite for the polluters.

November’s COP26 conference offers the world’s leaders a renewed chance to chart a better course for humanity. Eloquent words and bold promises won’t matter. Only credible commitments anchored in enacted policy changes will matter. Examples include eliminating fossil fuel subsidies, permanently suspending the awarding of new oil and gas exploration and drilling leases, shutting down the coal industry, providing investments for rapidly building and scaling clean energy technologies, levying a fee on the greenhouse gas polluters for their pollution, and establishing binding deadlines for the transition toward achieving global net zero emissions.

There still remains time for a reasonable transition. However, each day of relative inaction only squanders the slender amount of time that now separates relatively painless transition from painful disruption.

The world’s leaders can still secure humanity’s future. At COP26, they should rise to the occasion. What course will they choose?

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50 comments

Amelia said:

The words 'peace' and 'beauty' come to mind instantly, and yet the background to this photo is a lot less pleasant. Excellent information, Don, thank you.
11 months ago

Schussentäler said:

on black it is a stunning shot
11 months ago

William Sutherland said:

Extraordinary pair and beauty that belies the horror that is destroying our planet and shoving the human race towards extinction (thousands of heat-related deaths in the Northwest alone!). The horrors in Madagascar also cry out for justice against the culprits you so accurately mention. One can only hope they are brought to justice and their crimes are ended before it's too late and our planet becomes a lifeless inhospitable world. Stay well!

Admired in: www.ipernity.com/group/tolerance
11 months ago

Peter Castell said:

The sad situation of the fires provided you with wonderful photos. In the UK there are no deep coal mines now just a little bit of opencast, the coal fired power stations are only used as a backup on odd occasions. Yes much must come from governments but individuals can play their part consider the carbon footprint of some globe trotting members of ipernity for example.With the covid restrictions much of the bleating has come from those wanting to jet off on holiday
11 months ago

Josiane Dirickx said:

Magnifique clichés ( et pourtant quand on le lis vos informations c'est triste !!!! )
11 months ago ( translate )

RHH said:

We've had a lot of smoke and fires in our area.
11 months ago

RHH said:

Thinks for your visit.
11 months ago

RHH said:

Have a good day.
11 months ago ( translate )

RHH said:

11 months ago ( translate )

Malik Raoulda said:

Un rendu d'une extrême beauté relatif aux événements du sujet qui sont très révélateurs.
Le réchauffement climatique, dû surtout aux gaz a effet de serre avec un effet très négatif d'où la perturbation climatologique à travers tous les continents.. Chez nous les températures sont très élevées (le pic d'il y a deux jours était de +44°). Les précipitations contrairement a l'Europe sont nulles depuis presque 06 mois.Les barrages sont vides au 3/4 et la sécheresse menace sérieusement le pays.L’Algérie a connu un déficit en pluviométrie compris entre 20 et 30 % sur les trois dernières années, ce qui rend le dessalement d’eau de mer une option « incontournable ». Pour faire boire la population.
Votre reportage est d'une importance capitale et vitale à la fois et surtout très évocateur ..
A nous de préserver et de faire attention à la protection de la nature et aux conditions climatologique.
11 months ago ( translate )

Cheryl Kelly (cher12… said:

Fantastic!
11 months ago ( translate )

©UdoSm said:

A great morning, full of silence and peace...
11 months ago

Jaap van 't Veen said:

Awesome minimalism.
Healthy sunny week ahead.
11 months ago

Nick Weall said:

Well put
11 months ago ( translate )

Wierd Folkersma said:

stunning shot, but a sad story.
11 months ago